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Special reports & media releases

Latest special report

Over one-half of adult New Zealanders believe New Zealand’s record on gender equality is ‘better’ than most other Western countries (55 percent)

In a poll completed in June 2015, by telephone, with a representative sample of adult New Zealanders, 18 years and more, we found that most adult New Zealanders believe men and women are ‘treated equally’ in the health system (72 percent believe they are ‘treated equally’) and in the education system (68 percent), but the level of equality is perceived to be very different in other settings. For example, about one-half believe men and women are ‘treated equally’ in the courts and the justice system generally (59 percent), in social settings (57 percent) and in government policies and programmes (54 percent).

However, the most pronounced differences are in relation to the workplace and in business:

  • While 46 percent believe men and women are ‘treated equally’ in the workplace; 45 percent believe men are treated ‘more favourably’ compared to four percent who believe women are treated ‘more favourably’.


  • While 32 percent believe men and women are ‘treated equally’ in business; 62 percent believe men are treated ‘more favourably’ compared to two percent who believe women are treated ‘more favourably’.

Despite these and other results, over one-half of adult New Zealanders believe New Zealand’s record on gender equality is ‘better’ than most other Western countries (55 percent).

For the full report, please click here



Latest media release

14/11/17 - New Zealanders views about MMP and other aspects of the current voting system

In a new poll conducted in late in October, just after the General Election and after the new government had been formed, a nationally-representative sample of New Zealanders, 18+ who had voted were asked a number of questions about MMP and other aspects of the current voting system.

The key results are as follows:

  • Almost one-half of respondents (47%) stated they were satisfied with the MMP voting system, but 37% claimed they were dissatisfied.

  • More than one-half of respondents (56 percent) believed voters should be required to provide appropriate ID at the polling booth, but 40% disagreed.

  • One-third of respondents (34 percent) stated they would like to see compulsory voting introduced, but 59% disagreed.

Additional questions were asked about MMP:

  • Almost one-half of respondents (47 percent) agreed that the ‘MMP voting system results in a government that better represents all New Zealanders’, but 32% disagreed.

  • Twenty-eight percent of respondents believed that ‘coalition governments that result under the MMP system are less effective at running the country than the previous First-Past-the-Post system’, but 52% disagreed.

  • Almost one-half of respondents (47%) agreed with the statement, ‘the fact that the party that got the most votes in the recent election didn't form the new government doesn't worry me’, whereas 42% agreed.

View the media release



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