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Special reports & media releases

Latest special report

Over one-half of adult New Zealanders believe New Zealand’s record on gender equality is ‘better’ than most other Western countries (55 percent)

In a poll completed in June 2015, by telephone, with a representative sample of adult New Zealanders, 18 years and more, we found that most adult New Zealanders believe men and women are ‘treated equally’ in the health system (72 percent believe they are ‘treated equally’) and in the education system (68 percent), but the level of equality is perceived to be very different in other settings. For example, about one-half believe men and women are ‘treated equally’ in the courts and the justice system generally (59 percent), in social settings (57 percent) and in government policies and programmes (54 percent).

However, the most pronounced differences are in relation to the workplace and in business:

  • While 46 percent believe men and women are ‘treated equally’ in the workplace; 45 percent believe men are treated ‘more favourably’ compared to four percent who believe women are treated ‘more favourably’.


  • While 32 percent believe men and women are ‘treated equally’ in business; 62 percent believe men are treated ‘more favourably’ compared to two percent who believe women are treated ‘more favourably’.

Despite these and other results, over one-half of adult New Zealanders believe New Zealand’s record on gender equality is ‘better’ than most other Western countries (55 percent).

For the full report, please click here



Latest media release

05/10/17 - New Zealanders’ Views on Legalising Cannabis-based Products for Medicinal Purposes

The purpose of the Misuse of Drugs Amendment Bill is to make it legal for New Zealanders who are suffering from terminal illness or any debilitating condition to use cannabis or cannabis products with the support of a registered medical practitioner.

In May we conducted a poll to find out whether New Zealanders’ thought about this, and found that over three-quarters of respondents (77 percent) supported legalising cannabis-based products for medicinal purposes, while 16 percent stated that they did not support this and a further eight percent did not know or refused.

Further, when we examined this by a range of demographic factors, we found very few differences. This suggests that support is universal.

View the media release



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